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20 Spectacular And Rare Weather Phenomena That You Won’t Believe Happen On Our Planet

beben-eleben:

Brinicle

Brinicles are the underwater equivalent of icicles. They form beneath ice when a flow of saline water is introduced to ocean water.

Volcanic lightning

Volcanic plumes produce immense amounts of electrical charge and static. In rare cases, this can spark a violent lightning storm.

Sprites, Elves and Blue Jets

These colourful shapes are the result of electrical discharges in the atmosphere.

Fire Rainbows

Fire Rainbows are formed by light reflecting from ice crystals in high level clouds. The halos are so large, they often appear parallel to the horizon.

White rainbows

These rainbows form in fog, rather than rain. The condensation reflects little light, and as a result, the rainbow is made up of very weak colors - like white - rather than the vibrant colors of a traditional rainbow.

Fire Whirls

Fire whirls are whirlwinds of flame. They occur when intense heat and turbulent wind conditions combine.

Catatumbo Lightning

At the mouth of the Catatumbo River in Venezuela, a very unique mass of storm clouds swirl, creating the rare spectacle known as Catatumbo lightning. The storm occurs up to 160 nights a year, 10 hours per day and 280 times an hour.

Moonbow

Moonbows are rainbows produced by light reflected off the surface of the moon, rather than the sun. Due to the small amount of light reflected off the moon, moonbows are quite faint.

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nubbsgalore:

the bioluminescent noctiluca scintillans — an algae known otherwise as sea sparkle — of australia’s jervis bay. photos by (click pic) andy hutchinson, joanne paquette and naomi paquette. see also: more bioluminescence posts)

amandapalmer:

mybluejellyfish:

Amanda Palmer & Neil Gaiman - Perfect Couple.

man.

sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr

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medievalpoc:

Jan Brueghel the Elder

Folkdance Before the Archdukes

Netherlands (1623)

Oil on Canvas, 130 x 266 cm.

Not only does this depiction of a folkdance performed by the common folk of the Netherlands for a visiting member of the nobility show us a diverse crowd, it also has an example of how disability was depicted in medieval and renaissance European art.

The young man in the foreground running to fetch water almost certainly has Trisomy 21, also known as Down Syndrome. Depictions of both children and adults with Down Syndrome are common and well-documented in early modern artworks, in everyday scenes like this one as well as religious paintings and portraiture. Andrea Mantegna is known to have depicted Jesus Christ as having Down Syndrome in at least three separate painting:

Disability as well as racial diversity is another marginalized narrative in the art history education we most commonly receive in the United States. You can read more about this in On the Antiquity of Trisomy 21: Moving Towards a Quantitative Diagnosis of Down Syndrome in Historic Material Culture by John M. Starbuck, from the Journal of Contemporary Anthropology. You can read a bit more on the Wikipedia page for Themes in  Italian Renaissance Painting, and A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability”: The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe by C. F. Goodey.

ninjasexfarty:

Important, always-relevant comic done by the wonderful Ursa Eyer.

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

neil-gaiman:

masochismtango:

neil-gaiman:

The glorious Chris Riddell cover to THE SLEEPER AND THE SPINDLE, my strange (but Locus Award winning) story about an almost Snow White and a kind of Sleeping Beauty. Coming out from Bloomsbury the week of Hallowe’en.
View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay 

IS THIS THE STORY THAT NEIL GAIMAN READ TO US TWO YEARS AGO AT BARD COLLEGE!?!?!?!?!

One and the same, although what I read you was the first draft, and this is the (Locus Award winning) second draft…

neil-gaiman:

masochismtango:

neil-gaiman:

The glorious Chris Riddell cover to THE SLEEPER AND THE SPINDLE, my strange (but Locus Award winning) story about an almost Snow White and a kind of Sleeping Beauty. Coming out from Bloomsbury the week of Hallowe’en.

View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay

IS THIS THE STORY THAT NEIL GAIMAN READ TO US TWO YEARS AGO AT BARD COLLEGE!?!?!?!?!

One and the same, although what I read you was the first draft, and this is the (Locus Award winning) second draft…